10 things you need to know about chocolate

We are looking forward to National Chocolate Week here at Wivenhoe House and to celebrate we have put together a list of 10 things you need to know about chocolate

 

  • The name chocolate comes from the Aztec word “xocalati” (bitter water) – Not at all surprising, being that they concocted a drink by combining cacao with chillie peppers, achiote, cornmeal and it’s believed they added a form of hallucnogenic mushroom (possibly helped to take their minds of the taste).
  • Chocolate was used as Money – In Mayan times the cocoa bean was used as currency as it was considered to be worth more than gold dust. Cultivation of the beans was restricted so the value of cocoa beans as money would not go down.
  • White chocolate isn’t real chocolate – In order to be classified as real chocolate, a product has to contain cocoa solids or cocoa liquor. White “chocolate” contains cocoa butter instead.
  • The chocolate chip cookie was an accident – In 1930 Ruth Wakefield realised she was out of baker’s chocolate and mixed broken piece of Nestle chocolate into her cookie dough, expecting the chocolate to be absorbed and create chocolate cookies. Instead, she accidentally created chocolate chip cookies, and later sold the idea to Nestle in return for a lifetime supply of chocolate.
  • The largest chocolate sculpture weighs 10,187 kg (22,458.49 lbs) and was created by Aficion Chocolate (China) in Jiaxing, Zhejiang, China on 30 September 2015. The sculpture was in the shape of a building and measured 4.08 m x 2.39 m x 2.02 m.
  • The word chocolate was first recorded in English in 1604 – Though England’s first cup of chocolate was not brewed until 1647.
  • M&Ms were created in 1941 as a means for soldiers to enjoy chocolate without it melting.
  • Chocolate has an anti-bacterial effect on the mouth and protects against tooth decay.
  • Chocolate is the only edible substance to melt around 93° F, just below human body temperature – That’s why chocolate melts in your mouth.
  • Scientists can reduce the fat in chocolate by 20% by passing it through an electric field.

If this has got you in the chocolately mood then why not book in for our Chocolate afternoon tea? Tables can be reserved by calling 01206 863666

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WHERE WE ARE

find us, however you travel
By car:

Whether approaching Wivenhoe House from London and the South or Ipswich and the North via the A12, take the exit marked Colchester (A133). Follow the A133 towards Clacton, ignore the entrance to the Knowledge Gateway, continue along the A133 then take the B1028 for Wivenhoe before turning right into Boundary Road, then right again into Park Road. The entrance for Wivenhoe House is shared with the University of Essex but Park Road leads you through Wivenhoe Park and you will be able to see the glorious house from the road.

For Sat Nav please use CO7 9HT and then follow signage to Wivenhoe House. Please note, some Sat Navs may direct you to the wrong side of Wivenhoe Park so please check our PDF Map

Download our PDF Map

By train:

Colchester station, Colchester Town station, Wivenhoe station and Hythe stations are all between 10-15 minutes from Wivenhoe House by car. Trains run between London (Liverpool Street) and Colchester station every 10-20 minutes. The journey takes around an hour. Also connect with Colchester from Norwich, Ipswich, Felixstowe & Harwich. Some trains from London (Liverpool Street) also stop at Wivenhoe Station. When travelling from the Clacton/Walton direction, alight at Wivenhoe or Hythe Stations.


By plane:

Stansted airport is approximately 45 minutes from Wivenhoe House by car. Helicopter pad coordinates are 603200/223900.